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Apple v. Pepper – 1.5 Years Later

By Ronald Tittle on Thursday, September 17th, 2020

2017 brought a surprising change in antitrust law, where the Supreme Court reexamined and clarified who has standing to bring an antitrust violation under the Sherman Act.[1] The rule that the Supreme Court set out nearly 40 years before was clarified as a “bright-line rule,” which while clarifying the rule, also ended up shaking up…

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Challenges to Illinois’s Stay at Home Orders in Response to COVID-19

By Christopher Menich on Friday, May 8th, 2020

Throughout the United States, various stay at home orders have been implemented, with the primary purpose of protecting against the spread and effects of COVID-19, also known as coronavirus.[1] As of April 20, 2020, 42 states had effected orders, with varying provisions, directing citizens to limit their exposure by staying at home.[2] Although these orders…

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Booking.com v. United States Patent and Trademark Office

By Cassie Boles on Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

                                                                                                                                                I.     Case Background In 2011, Booking.com filed for federal trademark registration for marks related to “Booking.com” with the United States Patent and Trademark office (USPTO).[i] Booking.com is a website which offers customers the ability to book travel and hotel reservations. Upon review, the USPTO rejected Booking.com’s application on grounds that the marks were not…

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Illinois Rejects Contention That an Attorney’s Own Representations in Court May Raise a Claim For Ineffective Assistance of Counsel Without the Direction of Defendant

By Kandace Hofer on Friday, March 20th, 2020

Illinois recently answered the question of whether an attorney’s arguments in court could be used as “admission[s] of ineffective assistance of counsel.”[1] In November of 2019, the Supreme Court of Illinois decided that “a claim of ineffective assistance of counsel must come from the defendant himself” in People v. Bates.[2] This holding came after the…

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