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Mail-In Ballot Extensions: The Court’s Limited Role

By Taylor Kollmansberger on Thursday, November 19th, 2020

Despite the high scrutiny surrounding traditional voting alternatives this year, absentee voting and early voting are hardly novel concepts. Roughly 32 million people voted early in the 2012 General Election.[1] In the 2016 election, that number increased to 47 million people voting before Election Day.[2] In the 2020 General Election, that number shattered records coming…

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Kahler V. Kansas: The Supreme Court Case That Decided Upon The Constitutionality Of Replacing The Traditional Insanity Defense With The Mens Rea Approach

By Michelle Disilvestro on Wednesday, October 21st, 2020

On October 7, 2019, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the case Kahler v. Kansas and discussed the constitutionality of abolishing the traditional insanity defense.[1] On March 23, 2020, the United States Supreme Court held that the Fourteenth Amendment does not require Kansas to adopt an insanity test based on a defendant’s…

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Apple v. Pepper – 1.5 Years Later

By Ronald Tittle on Thursday, September 17th, 2020

2017 brought a surprising change in antitrust law, where the Supreme Court reexamined and clarified who has standing to bring an antitrust violation under the Sherman Act.[1] The rule that the Supreme Court set out nearly 40 years before was clarified as a “bright-line rule,” which while clarifying the rule, also ended up shaking up…

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Challenges to Illinois’s Stay at Home Orders in Response to COVID-19

By Christopher Menich on Friday, May 8th, 2020

Throughout the United States, various stay at home orders have been implemented, with the primary purpose of protecting against the spread and effects of COVID-19, also known as coronavirus.[1] As of April 20, 2020, 42 states had effected orders, with varying provisions, directing citizens to limit their exposure by staying at home.[2] Although these orders…

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