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Booking.com v. United States Patent and Trademark Office

By Cassie Boles on Wednesday, April 1st, 2020

                                                                                                                                                I.     Case Background In 2011, Booking.com filed for federal trademark registration for marks related to “Booking.com” with the United States Patent and Trademark office (USPTO).[i] Booking.com is a website which offers customers the ability to book travel and hotel reservations. Upon review, the USPTO rejected Booking.com’s application on grounds that the marks were not…

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Illinois Rejects Contention That an Attorney’s Own Representations in Court May Raise a Claim For Ineffective Assistance of Counsel Without the Direction of Defendant

By Kandace Hofer on Friday, March 20th, 2020

Illinois recently answered the question of whether an attorney’s arguments in court could be used as “admission[s] of ineffective assistance of counsel.”[1] In November of 2019, the Supreme Court of Illinois decided that “a claim of ineffective assistance of counsel must come from the defendant himself” in People v. Bates.[2] This holding came after the…

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AIVIA: A STEP TOWARDS PROTECTING DATA PRIVACY OR A CONTINUATION OF THE PUSH FOR INDIVIDUALS TO TRADE THEIR PRIVACY RIGHTS FOR EMPLOYMENT?

By Gabrielle Neace on Thursday, February 20th, 2020

Would you like your most cringe-worthy moment recorded and stored indefinitely? Under new Illinois law, if your interview is reviewed by Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and you do not request the video to be deleted, a company can keep it forever. In a seemingly ground-breaking data privacy measure, Illinois became the first state to enact a…

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