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AN OVERLOOKED PROVISION OF ILLINOIS’ CANNABIS REGULATION AND TAX ACT: AN EXEMPTION TO THE SMOKE FREE ILLINOIS ACT

By Evan Kanz on Monday, August 12th, 2019

Following through on one of his biggest campaign promises, on Tuesday, June 25th, Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker signed legislation making Illinois the 11th state to legalize recreational marijuana and the first state to do so without a voter-approved referendum.[1] The new law, commonly known as The Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (“CRTA”), takes effect on…

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The Eighth Amendment & Juveniles in Illinois

By Jamie Richardson on Thursday, July 25th, 2019

The Illinois Supreme Court recently handed down a decision regarding juveniles and the Eight Amendment of the United States Constitution.[1] The Eight Amendment states, “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted.”[2] “Cruel and unusual punishment” seems to be straight forward but it took multiple landmark cases…

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CONSTITUTIONAL INTERPRETATION: AN OVERVIEW OF ORIGINALISM AND LIVING CONSTITUTIONALISM

By Michael Stramaglia on Sunday, June 9th, 2019

Originalists today make, interpret and enforce the law by the original meaning of the Constitution as it was originally written.[1] The original meaning is how the terms of the Constitution were commonly understood at the time of ratification.[2] Most, if not all Originalists begin their analysis with the text of the Constitution.[3] Similarly, Textualists consider…

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Tax Software Companies are the Reason Americans Pay Fees to File Taxes

By Christina Everling on Friday, April 26th, 2019

The United States’ taxation system is often referred to as “voluntary” even though taxpayers are required to file returns and pay taxes. “Voluntary tax compliance” means taxpayers do so “without direct compulsion from the IRS.”[1] What this means is that payment of income taxes is mandatory, but taxpayers voluntarily calculate their taxes owed.[2] While the…

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Essay: A Historical Overview of Disenfranchisement, the Voting Rights Act, and Shelby County’s Impact on the 2018 Midterm Elections

By Sean McGrath on Thursday, March 21st, 2019

For nearly four decades, Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act required certain states and localities to garner pre-approval prior to implementing any changes in laws that affect voting.[1] That has all changed with a Supreme Court decision in 2013.[2] Since that time, instances of subtle (or not so subtle) voter discrimination has taken place…

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